Tag Archives: biography

Wishful Drinking – Carrie Fisher

Carrie Fisher is funny as fuck. There. That’s it. Read this book if you want to laugh.

 

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In Wishful Drinking, adapted from her one-woman stage show, Fisher reveals what it was really like to grow up a product of “Hollywood in-breeding,” come of age on the set of a little movie called Star Wars, and become a cultural icon and bestselling action figure at the age of nineteen.

Intimate, hilarious, and sobering, Wishful Drinking is Fisher, looking at her life as she best remembers it (what do you expect after electroshock therapy?). It’s an incredible tale: the child of Hollywood royalty — Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher — homewrecked by Elizabeth Taylor, marrying (then divorcing, then dating) Paul Simon, having her likeness merchandized on everything from Princess Leia shampoo to PEZ dispensers, learning the father of her daughter forgot to tell her he was gay, and ultimately waking up one morning and finding a friend dead beside her in bed.

And really, she is very funny. Some bits of this book were funny enough that I had to photograph them and send them to a friend.

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My Top Biography and Memoir Reads for 2017

Having looked at all the non-fiction I’ve read this year, I’ve decided to split them up into science, politics and feminism, and biography and memoir, otherwise I would have a really long blog post summing it all up! I can’t quite believe I’ve managed to read 22 non-fiction books this year! and there’s still a few weeks left… what if I read another incredible book before January?

These are my favourite non-fiction biography and memoir reads for the year, out of the ones I have read this year, not that they were necessarily published this year. Click on the images to go to my longer reviews.

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Anger is an Energy: My Life Uncensored – John Lydon

You will like it if you like John Lydon, or are just generally interested in the Sex Pistols. I am both of these things and I loved it!

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Night – Elie Wiesel

I read this because it’s on the reading challenge list I was trying to read from this year. I honestly had never heard of it before, but it seems it’s very well known in the United States. I don’t know if it’s just generally not as well known in the UK or if its just me? but we certainly didn’t read it at school, or anything like it. I realise we

Night is Elie Wiesel’s incredible story of his experience of the holocaust in Nazi Germany. He spent time in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. He wrote it because there were hardly any people who survived who could tell the story, and it must not be forgotten.

 

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Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? – Jeanette Winterson

A grim childhood in the grim north. My hometown is on the front cover. It’s like visiting an entirely different world. Combined with Jeanette Winterson’s extreme childhood, where the Apocalypse is just around the corner and books are not allowed, we get a fascinating portrait of life in 1960s working class Accrington.

Despite her childhood, Jeanette Winterson get a place at Oxford University and when she arrives she discovers the sexism and misogyny she now has to contend with. It’s a brilliant book that will make you want to reach for and achieve your own dreams.

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Me Talk Pretty One Day – David Sedaris

I know this isn’t strictly non-fiction. I’d like to think enough of it is to just about get into here! I’ve put this as one of my top of the year because inside it has the line that has made me laugh out loud, in complete hysterics because it’s so funny. I still get a little giggle when I think of it now. We can talk about what it is when you’ve read it too. 😀

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Believe Me: A Memoir of Love, Death, and Jazz Chickens – Eddie Izzard

Eddie Izzard didn’t have quite the grim upbringing Jeanette Winterson had, but he has his share of hard times to deal with. Particularly his transgender identity is a struggle during his younger years, and he spent ten years trying and failing to make it as a performer. He had an idyllic childhood until his mother dies when he is six, and he is then shipped off to boarding school – at six years old. His success, when it comes, is lovely.

I had the audiobook version and it must be twice the length of the paper one because Izzard fills it with additional information in the form of numerous extra footnotes.

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Here are all the non-fiction books I read this year (click to go to my review):

Book Review: Anger is an Energy – John Lydon

I like John Lydon. He is straight to the point and I agree with a lot of his core attitudes and beliefs. That’s not to say I agree with everything he says, and boy, does he have a lot to say. At almost 520 pages this is no quick read. Still, I loved every minute of it. You are fully getting his no holds barred opinions here. Or if he is holding back, you certainly can’t tell!

If you stand up for whatever it is you really believe in, if you really stand up, and be accounted for, people will rate you highly.

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Anger is an Energy on the kindle with some other punk books!

His account of the Sex Pistols days is fascinating and quite sad. He felt alone and disregarded and/or ignored by the rest of the band most of the time. It comes across that the other three (Glen Matlock, Steve Jones and Paul Cook) never really accepted him fully into the band, as they already formed the band before John came along. I have no doubt that John, as he freely admits, isn’t the easiest person to get along with! and he just rubbed them up the wrong way (a theme throughout the book). I would definitely like to read some other accounts of that time period to get some other perspectives on what happened. As you can see from the picture above, I have Steve Jones’ book ready to go.

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L-R Glen Matlock, John Lydon, Steve Jones, and Paul Cook.

 

It is fascinating though. That band were truly at the heart of an amazing moment in history. It probably helps that I’m a fan of punk rock. I love his scorn of the majority of punk bands. I share a lot of the same views. So many identikit bands trying to out macho each other. Repulsive. The bands he praises are all stand out bands like the Buzzcocks. He hates that punk quickly became very narrow in its definition: there’s a certain uniform, a haircut, a way of treating people, a sound – and woe betide anyone who doesn’t conform. John refuses to be narrowly defined – especially musically, but actually in every aspect of his life, and so he gets constant abuse in his life beyond the Sex Pistols. A constant minority who seek him out and are angry because he ‘sold out’. In other words, he dared to move on and try new things that musically interest him.

Being open-minded to all kinds of music was Lesson One in punk, but that didn’t seem to be understood by many of the alleged punk bands that followed on after, who seemed to be waving this idea of a punk manifesto. I’m sorry, but I never did this for the narrow-minded. I was horrified by the cliche that punk was turning into.

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The Sex Pistols after Sid Vicious had replace Glen Matlock. L-R Steve Jones, Sid Vicious, John Lydon, Paul Cook. 

Earlier in the book we get some of his home life growing up. He’s from a very working class London background. His descriptions of himself at school were great and really clear – I know EXACTLY what sort of student he would have been in my classroom – one of those cheeky, annoying but lovable ones! Frustrated with their lack of effort because you can’t follow their particular interest all the time. Full of questions that are related, but are a distraction to what you actually need to teach that day. Oh, sorry, just having high school teaching flash backs there!

His move from a school to basically a technical college for naughty kids chucked out of school is interesting and there he meets Sid. I love this quote about his time at the technical college. The idea that he still wore his school uniform is absurd, and says so much about his personality!

It was basically just school by any stretch, so I wore my William of York uniform still, because I didn’t want to wear anything that I liked. But it was a bit of a fashion parade. Sidney certainly used it as a catwalk.

After Glen Matlock leaves the Sex Pistols, Sid is brought in and the break up of the band seems almost inevitable at this point. It’s such a dysfunctional relationship they all have.

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Sid Vicious and Johnny Rotten (aka John Ritchie and John Lydon)

After the Sex Pistols you get a lot of details about line up and management changes for Public Image Limited (PiL). I’m not familiar with the musicians from this band, and didn’t know any of the many people discussed. It’s still interesting, but in more of a vague way of seeing how all over the place the band and John’s life was. This continues up until the later 90s where you get a Sex Pistols reunion tour. Then in the 2000s there is I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here – which I remember watching because Lydon was on it. Followed by a few nature programs he makes. And of course the infamous butter commercials!

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John Lydon by Paul Heartfield from http://www.clashmusic.com/features/in-conversation-john-lydon

At this stage you discover that Lydon, and his wife Nora, begin to parent Nora’s grandchildren. It’s a sweet part of the book where he explains how they had to change their lives to give everything they could to these wild teenagers that they were suddenly responsible for. All the parts of the book where he describes his love for Nora are quite beautiful. They fell in love when they met during the Sex Pistols time, in 1975, and they are still together today.

Overall, this is a great book. It possibly helps if you have some interest in Lydon to begin with, but I imagine you must if you are considering reading 520 pages about him! It’s glorious that there is a note from the publisher at the beginning basically begging you to not sent in grammatical errors from the text – Lydon has his own way of using English and the ‘mistakes’ are just how he is talking!

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‘Don’t let tiffles cause fraction’

Lydon is upfront, unapologetic, harsh, and uncompromising. But he’s also a family man, loyal, a supporter of education, and interested in everything the world has to offer. There’s a place for him at the table of my imaginary perfect dinner party anyway.

Book review: Dancing With Myself – Billy Idol

Great for the early punk stuff. Wish I’d then just abandoned it.

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His account of London and the early punk scene is great. He was there when it all started and I really enjoyed this part of the book. I am much more of a fan Generation X rather than most of his later music anyway (except White wedding and Rebel Yell, obvs!).

The rest of the book is  him completely wrecking himself with drugs. Random explicit pornographic stories.Then getting over heroin and cocaine addiction with a two week holiday. Also, spirits are real. And women are just objects. At one point he is at a brothel with women who just have numbers on them. He even gets someone else to choose because these women are nothing but warm holes to him. Yuck.

This book details his addictions in such a lighthearted way, along with his destructive, violent side. So then I wrecked another hotel room, oops. Paid them some money then did it again. Oh well!

I would read the first third, then forget the rest.